STOP SAYING ‘You Are Welcome’

 

 

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We all know that it’s polite to say “Thank you” to someone after they’ve done something nice or helpful. But did you know that “You’re welcome” isn’t the only way to respond when someone thanks you? As a matter of fact, “You’re welcome” should be ostracized from your vocabulary.

Why?

Okay, let’s put it this way. Replying “you’re welcome” to being thanked is like you are taking credit for the action.

Saying “you’re welcome” is akin to saying “You couldn’t have done it without me” or “yes, you should be thanking me”.

In an article written by Caroline Bologna for Huffpost titled, “Why Don’t We Say ‘You’re Welcome’ Anymore?”, she wrote,

“Over the years, American etiquette experts have lamented the apparent decline in the use of the phrase “you’re welcome” in everyday conversation. I think people worry that with ‘you’re welcome,’ it’s an expectation that this person should have thanked you and they did, in fact, do the right thing. “People don’t want to appear as if they’re expecting praise. But in trying to be humble, what happens is that many of us have difficulty accepting gratitude or compliments”.

Gratitude could be likened to a game of tennis while “thank you” is the ball. As soon as someone thanks you for something, return the ball (thank you) back to the person by being thanking them for something else they did instead of stopping the ball dead by saying “you’re welcome”.

For example, a friend tells you “thank you” for giving her a listening ear. Don’t just “you’re welcome”, you can say “please don’t mention, I should thanking you for opening up to me”.

What you just did as in the game of tennis is hitting the ball back to her.

“You’re welcome” or “uwc” as social media folks would love to abbreviate, is simply taking credit for an act of kindness or rendered help or expecting the person to be grateful when you should be deflecting the credit back to the person.

Don’t ever let anyone “out-thank”. Meaning at every opportunity you get, be the most humble one because God reminded us in Matthew 23:12 says “And whoever exalts himself shall be humbled; and whoever humbles himself shall be exalted.”

Remember, gratitude is like a tennis match and “thank you” is the ball. Whenever someone says “thank you/thanks” and you say “you’re welcome”, you have held the ball and that’s pride and “pride goes before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18).

Instead, return the ball back by thanking them back.

No matter what you have done for someone, never settle with “you’re welcome” in response to their gratitude to you.

A man gets his wife a car and she is all grateful to him and thanking him profusely. Only a proud arrogant man would then reply to her “you’re welcome”.

A humble man would say things in these words, “my darling wife, I should be the one thanking you for all your love and care for me. All your endless prayers and support. I should be thanking you for being such an amazing wife to me and a super mother to our kids. This car is just a token of my appreciation to you for everything you have done and more”.

Do you see the difference?

Going forward, delete “you’re welcome” from your vocabulary. Even God Himself doesn’t say “you’re welcome” when we thank Him for something He has done. Do you know what He does when we are grateful? He blesses us with more. Ask the one leper who came back to give thanks (Luke 17:11-19).

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Instead of “you’re welcome” use these words:
1) It is my pleasure.
2) Thank YOU
3) I know you’d do the same for me!
4) No worries!
5) Not at all!
6) Don’t mention it!
7) It was nothing!
8) It was the least I could do!
9) Don’t count it!
10) I’m happy to help!
11) Nothing at all!
12) It was no trouble at all!
13) I was happy to be of assistance!
14) No need to thank me!
15) Not a problem!
16) Anytime my brother!
17) I should be the one thanking you!

All of these phrases mean that the person was happy to help you, doesn’t take credit for the act and would readily do more if need be.

If words fail you when being thanked, simply say “Thank God”.

 

 

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